A “Jaws” Dropping Attack

Jordan Ondo, Writer

Last Saturday, September 15th, a 26 year old man Arthur Medici was killed in a shark attack.

 

Medici was riding waves with his friend on their boogie boards at Newcomb Hollow Beach in Cape Cod. Within little time, Medici was grabbed by the foot and pulled into the water by what witnesses say was a 10-12 foot shark.

 

Medici and his friend were 30-40 yards off shore at around noon. When the shark bit Medici his friend, Isaac Rocha, pulled him out of the water and swam him into shore. He used the boogie board string to tie Medicis leg and stop the bleeding. As Medici was laying on the sand, witnesses scrambled to help. Unfortunately, it was too late as Medici passed away from blood loss at the Cape Cod Hospital.

 

Shark attacks are strangely becoming more common in Massachusetts. In fact, there hasn’t been a shark attack in Massachusetts since 1936.

 

In August, another swimmer was attacked and wounded after swimming in Cape Cod beach. The 61 year old was swimming about 30 feet out in the ocean when the attack happened.

 

Signs have been posted outside Cape Cod beaches warning swimmers about the recent shark sightings which could potentially scare business away on beach fronts. However, people continue to swim even after the warnings.

 

“The recent shark attacks would make me more scared to go in the ocean because the attack would be fresh in my mind,” Junior Cammy Courtney exclaimed after hearing about recent shark attacks. Two shark attacks within a two month time period is tragic, but it has opened the eyes to lifeguards and swimmers to be more cautious.       

 

“Shark attacks hurt people so my natural instincts would tell me not to go in the water,” Junior Mikala Perry mentioned after hearing about the attacks. This is just one of the many remarks people have made regarding the attacks.

 

Although beaches are an enjoyable place for families and friends to spend time together, recent incidents in the beaches have changed perspectives on the ocean. Events like these teach people to be safer and more aware in the ocean in order to prevent incidents like Arthur Medicis from happening again.