Threats of ‘World War Three’ Causing Widespread Panic About the Possibility of a Draft

Uncle+Sam+accompanied+with+the+slogan+%E2%80%9CI+want+you%E2%80%9D+was+a+popular+way+to+try+and+recruit+soldiers+for+World+War+1+and+2.

Guna Bhegalam

Uncle Sam accompanied with the slogan “I want you” was a popular way to try and recruit soldiers for World War 1 and 2.

Rhian Evans, Writer

World War III memes have been spreading around the internet following the U.S. airstrike on Major General Qasem Soleimani.  One of the more popular memes is about getting drafted. This made people start asking the inevitable: will there be another draft?  

 

The first U.S. draft was during the Civil War.  It was supposed to have all men enlist, regardless of social class. However most rich men could afford to pay someone to take their place.  Because of this, the war was associated with the phrase “a rich man’s war, but a poor man’s fight”, because mostly poor men were the ones fighting.  

 

After the start of World War I, President Wilson deemed that the enlistment numbers were too low, he signed the Selective Service Act in 1917.  The Selective Service Act allowed the Federal government to raise a national army through conscription of men aged 18-30. This act also prohibited people from sending substitutes, and bounties, men who would enlist in the army collect the money then leave.  

 

The most recent draft was during the Vietnam War, where 2.2 million men were drafted between 1964 and 1973.  The draft ended in 1973, with the Selective Service registration stating that there would no longer be draft calls.  

 

In 1980, President Carter reinstated the Act.  However, all he required is that men register with the Selective Service within 30 days after turning 18 in case a draft is ever needed again. 

 

In early 2019, a federal judge ruled that excluding women from registering is unconstitutional.  Nothing has been done to change this, most likely due to there not needing a draft.  

 

Freshman Sophia Lamarre commented that women should be drafted as long as “they’re in good health”.

 

This brings back the question: will there be another draft if the U.S. goes to war with Iran?  Most people aren’t worried. Freshman Olivia Tehaan states, “It depends on how many people volunteer”. 

 

 The chances of needing one are very slim.  Even if the U.S. goes to war with Iran, there are enough volunteers in the military where a draft wouldn’t be needed.

 

In order for the Selective Service to be active and able to draft men involuntarily, a new law would have to be signed.  Panic should not be instilled in U.S. citizens. Unless someone is actively in the military, they won’t be shipped off to Iran.